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Advertisement: 1902 in American Monthly Review of Reviews

Beatrice Tonnesen Advertisement 1902From The American Monthly Review of Reviews, Edited by Albert Shaw, July-December 1902. Reproduced from Google Books.

Small prints says:

The Tonnesen Life Photographs are acknowledged to be the most superb productions in all the world. Beatrice Tonnesen, the poseuse, was the American Representative of Photography at the Paris Exposition, and stands at the head of Photographic Art.
In Black Flemish Oak, with Finest Belgian Glass,

  1. A. Hayseed,
  2. The Tonnesen Madonna,
  3. My Baby Sleeps,
  4. A Letter from Home,

Size, 11 x 18 inches.
If desired beautifully hand-colored, add $1 for one or all. Exquisite Holiday Gifts. Send P.O. or express order for $2 or $3 to

8 thoughts on “Advertisement: 1902 in American Monthly Review of Reviews

  1. i have a friend that has one of these pictures, “A Hayseed”. They are just want to know if it is worth any thing?

  2. Hello Jason,
    Tonnesen’s original prints are popular with collectors. How much your friend’s print is worth would depend on the condition of the print and whether and how it is framed. Also, “A Hayseed” was sold in black and white as well as color versions, with the color version being the rarer of the two. Thanks for visiting our website.
    Lois

  3. the picture I was asking about a hay seed is a black and white. the frame is black and in fair condition. the picture looks like it is in good condition we do not want to take it out of the frame. could you give us a ball park figure.

  4. Hi Jason,\nI am not an antiques dealer so I really hate to assign a value. Just as one who has occasionally noticed the sales of these types of prints, I would guess maybe $15 – $30. But you really should take it to a dealer and get a professional opinion.\nLois

  5. i will let them know that a dealer would be able to give them a better opinion on it. Thank you for you opinion.

  6. I have an oil painting of the hayseed. It is circa 1890 and wonder if it could be the original. Thanks,

  7. Hi Karen,
    Thanks for writing. How interesting! We’d love to see a photo of your oil painting, although we certainly aren’t art experts. Is the painting signed? Is anything written on the back of it? “The Hayseed” was one of Tonnesen’s early commercially successful photographs. Like most of Tonnesen’s original works, we know it existed as a photograph. But we don’t know if it ever became an oil painting, either by Tonnesen, her staff or the publisher. As seen in the early ad (above), it was marketed as a photograph which could be ordered in a hand-colored version. Tonnesen is known to have painted from some of her photos. Some of those have appeared as full color, signed prints and some have been found as prints attributed “From Painting by Tonnesen.” In addition, some of her photographs have appeared as full color prints, although unsigned and unattributed. In those cases, it is likely that someone – either a Tonnesen Studio artist or an artist on the staff of the publisher – painted from the photo, prior to publication. I do have a colored print of “The Hayseed” in my collection, and it would be interesting to compare its appearance with that of your painting. Mine has very subdued colors and I had assumed it was printed from a hand-colored photo. But it’s possible it came from a painting. If your painting is not signed by Tonnesen, and/or if it differs significantly from the photo, it is also possible that someone who owned a copy of one of the original prints, painted from it. It was not uncommon for print owners to paint from their favorite art or calendar prints.
    Hope to hear from you again,
    Lois